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During their courting rituals, the males present the females with Cantharidin (in the form of an “oozing gift”). The females of the species become allured, and during the process of mating, the males transfer the majority of the secreted Cantharidin along with spermatozoa. The female beetles use Cantharidin to cover the eggs for defense against predators. The synthesis of Cantharidin can be checked by '''6-fluoro mevalonate'''. The primary cause of the inhibition is usually attributed to the fluorine substituent.
 
During their courting rituals, the males present the females with Cantharidin (in the form of an “oozing gift”). The females of the species become allured, and during the process of mating, the males transfer the majority of the secreted Cantharidin along with spermatozoa. The female beetles use Cantharidin to cover the eggs for defense against predators. The synthesis of Cantharidin can be checked by '''6-fluoro mevalonate'''. The primary cause of the inhibition is usually attributed to the fluorine substituent.
  
The poisoning due to '''Cantharidin''' is a cause for concern among many animals, especially horses. Beetles feed on leaves and at times move to crop fields that grow livestock ('''alfalfa'''). Horses are known to be very sensitive against the blistering chemical secreted by '''Spanish Fly''' beetles within the median lethal dose (LD<sub>50</sub>), roughly around 1mg/kg of the horse’s body weight. The Great Bustard - a large, flightless bird found in Morocco, Europe and East Asia - is known to become intoxicated due to Cantharidin poisoning from ingesting blister beetles.  
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The poisoning due to '''Cantharidin''' is a cause for concern among many animals, especially horses. Beetles feed on leaves and at times move to crop fields that grow livestock ('''alfalfa'''). Horses are known to be very sensitive against the blistering chemical secreted by '''Spanish Fly''' beetles within the median lethal dose (LD<small>50</small>), roughly around 1mg/kg of the horse’s body weight. The Great Bustard - a large, flightless bird found in Morocco, Europe and East Asia - is known to become intoxicated due to Cantharidin poisoning from ingesting blister beetles.  
  
 
According to research, Cantharidine causes the release of '''serine proteases''', the enzymes responsible for the breakdown of peptide bonds in proteins. Once absorbed through the lipid membranes by the epidermal cells, Cantharidin triggers a chain of reactions that ultimately leads to acantholysis (loss of cellular adhesion and connections) and blistering of the skin.  
 
According to research, Cantharidine causes the release of '''serine proteases''', the enzymes responsible for the breakdown of peptide bonds in proteins. Once absorbed through the lipid membranes by the epidermal cells, Cantharidin triggers a chain of reactions that ultimately leads to acantholysis (loss of cellular adhesion and connections) and blistering of the skin.  

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