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8th Month Report on Virachey Camera-Trapping Project

Save Virachey National Park l

Our trusted group of Virachey National Park (VNP) rangers recently returned from a Habitat ID-sponsored camera-trap check, and the results are exciting. We were very much looking forward to seeing what kind of wildlife movements occurred during the rainy season, which was especially wet this year. In fact, the rangers attempted to check the cameras in late July but had to turn back due to high, fast-moving rivers. However, they were able to to reach all of the cameras in early October.

A sun bear looks at the camera while scratching its back on a tree.

A sun bear looks at the camera while scratching its back.

Our cameras turned up: a pack of endangered dholes (on three separate cameras), clouded leopards on 3 different cameras, leopard cat, sun bear, large Indian civet, common palm civet, mouse deer, red muntjac, pig-tailed macaques, stump-tailed macaques (this was a very interesting find, which we got on two different cameras, because while villagers have stated they live on the park they had yet to be confirmed by NGOs), gaur (including a photo of a mother and golden calf), Sambar deer, serow, hog badger, Malayan porcupine, wild pig, monitor lizard, owl (species still not known), red jungle fowl, Siamese fireback, lesser adjutant, black bird, and a small mammal we have not yet been able to identify.

An adult gaur and its calf in a remote section of VNP

An adult gaur and its calf in a remote section of VNP

Altogether our cameras recorded 17 species of mammal, four birds, and one reptile. We will also be launching two expeditions in January 2015 to install cameras in two highly remote locations inside VNP. In the meantime, have a look at more photos below:

A clouded leopard patrols a forested area near an upland savanna inside VNP

A clouded leopard patrols a forested area near an upland savanna inside VNP

The elusive stump-tailed macaque is now, thanks to our cams, confirmed in VNP

The elusive stump-tailed macaque is now, thanks to our cams, confirmed in VNP

A pack of dholes (Asiatic wild dogs) takes a rest

A pack of dholes (Asiatic wild dogs) takes a rest

Large Indian civet

Large Indian civet

Pig-tailed macaques frolic in the forest

Pig-tailed macaques frolic in the forest

A clouded leopard in another area of VNP

A clouded leopard in another area of VNP

Leopard cat

Leopard cat

A large wild pig cools off in a puddle

A large wild pig cools off in a puddle

Serow

Serow

Mouse deer, also known as the Chevrotain

Mouse deer, also known as the Chevrotain

A dhole in the Veal Thom Grasslands

A dhole in the Veal Thom Grasslands

In addition to our Virachey project, we also have a project going with L. Bruce Kekule down in southern Thailand. You can have a look at the first camera trap image we got back of a gorgeous clouded leopard here. Habitat ID field officer Greg McCann wrote a commentary for Mongabay.com about the Thailand project back in August, and you can find that article here.

Finally, we have an Indiegogo campaign going called Boats4Virachey in which we are trying to help the VNP staff acquire four boats with which they can patrol the Sesan River for illegal loggers and poachers transporting their good on the river. VNP currently has no boats for river patrols, and the Sesan snakes its way for nearly 100 kilometers through and around the perimeter of VNP. Your help is greatly appreciated!

 

 

4 Responses to 8th Month Report on Virachey Camera-Trapping Project

  1. Pingback: Camera Trap Footage » Wildlife & Nature Conservation - Page 10

  2. Hi Gerald. To answer your question, in order to get rapid help we’d need to get photos of a rhinoceros. Honestly, I imagine that even if we get photos of a tiger (which, by the way, I am certain we will get) I don’t think it would bring in the big NGOs such as WWF in a fast manner. We recently reached out to Wildlife Alliance -a top notch conservation NGO in Cambodia, but I never heard back from them. Therefore, I think we have to do everything ourselves. We need to buy some boats for the rangers to patrol the river to stop poachers who are ferrying their illicit goods (timber and wildlife) that was poached in Virachey. Anyone interested can help us out here: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/boats-for-virachey-np-rangers

  3. Virachey is the biggest forest land left in the kingdom. I am now 24. However, when I was young, I sometime lived in the area of wildlife habitat near border of Kompong cham and Kratie. 15 years passed, No forest left in the area. We all are sure we have lost something. Recently, I have visited Mudolkiri, 200km from where I was born, which was historically believed to be the dense forest land. All What I can see is the new big farms and plantations. I notice that there are couple of INGOs, and few NGOs helping these wild areas. It is not enough yet to protect or help the parks survive. Here I would like to share some ideas.Actually, There is new trend that young generation seem to get involve in the conservation of nature. So far, there are many successful campaigns of charity Fund Raising events have been celebrated in schools. Can the similar events happen for wild protection? And the social networking(Facebook) should be a part of campaign as well. I think the increase of such awareness will somewhat help reduce the poaching or logging in some long term, or even stop the concession. It’s time to broaden the existed community awareness level to the national awareness level. Turn it to the whole nation’s concern and start passing it to the young who are energetic and potential enough to carry on the conservation.

    • Hi Khoemdary.

      Thanks for posting, and I like your ideas. In fact, I’ve been wanting to visit schools in Ratanakiri to educate children about the natural heritage of their province. I need to get a projector so that I can display photos and videos about VNP. Maybe you’d like to help out?

      Greg

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