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First round of camera-trap results are in!

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We now have the memory cards for all 11 of our camera-traps that we placed in Cambodia’s Virachey National Park earlier this year. The images you see below (and we are still holding back on releasing a few) were taken in just 11 weeks of shooting -a fairly short amount of time. And yet the results are thrilling! We have what is probably the first ever photographic record of a Chinese Serow (Capricornis milneedwardsii) in Northeastern Cambodia, as well as a rare photo of an Asian Black Bear (Ursus thibetanus). In addition, we have a mysterious civet cat, one which may very well be new to science (see photo titled Mysterious Civet below) which has a single white band near the tip of its tail. According to Charles M. Francis’ definitive A Field Guide to the Mammals of Southeast Asia, there are no known civets with this tail pattern! These photographs prove that not only is Virachey brimming with wildlife, but it’s still full of surprises and that it needs to be protected! Click on the photos to enlarge.

Clouded leopard 1

Sun bear (Helarctos malayanus). This bear is hunted for its bile, fur, meat, and also trapped alive to but used as a circus animal

Sun bear (Helarctos malayanus). This bear is hunted for its bile, fur, meat, and also trapped alive to but used as a circus animal

A rare image of an Asian Black bear

A rare image of an Asian Black bear

Gaur (Bos gaurus), listed as "vulnerable" by the IUCN

Gaur (Bos gaurus), listed as “vulnerable” by the IUCN

Chinese Serow. Quite possibly the first record of this species in Northeastern Cambodia

Chinese Serow. Quite possibly the first record of this species in Northeastern Cambodia

Small-toothed Palm Civet

Small-toothed Palm Civet

Is this civet new to science? We -as well as our friends- are unable to ID it

Is this civet new to science? We -as well as our friends- are unable to ID it

Deer blinded by the lights!

Deer blinded by the lights!

a Leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis) takes a daylight stroll

a Leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis) takes a daylight stroll

look carefully in the upper right corner and you will see a wildcat. Is it the Fishing cat? We are not yet sure.

look carefully in the upper right corner and you will see a wildcat. Is it the Fishing cat? We are not yet sure.

this bird loves the camera attention (we have many photos of it)

this bird loves the camera attention (we have many photos of it)

Muntjac portrait

Muntjac, also known as the “barking deer”

Not a unicorn, but a Sambar deer (Asian elk) with a missing horn

Not a unicorn, but a Sambar deer (Asian elk) with a missing antler

Brush-tailed porcupines

Brush-tailed porcupines

Malayan porcupines (Hystrix brachyura)

Malayan porcupines (Hystrix brachyura)

Wild pig in the Veal Thom Grasslands

Wild pig in the Veal Thom Grasslands

A massive Sambar deer rises from a Veal Thom mud wallow hole. Prime tiger food!

A massive Sambar deer rises from a Veal Thom mud wallow hole. Prime tiger food!

red muntjac

red muntjac

Giant muntjac at the wallowing hole

Giant muntjac at the wallowing hole

The cameras will remain in the park throughout the summer and checked again in the Fall at the conclusion of the rainy season. We also plan to launch another camera-trapping exedition in early 2014 to the little-visited Yak Yeuk Grasslands near the Laos border, which we explored in 2013. In the meantime, we would like to thank Vuykeo Nhuy, Sou Soukern, Soukhon Thon, and Chou Sopheak from Virachey National Park for their invaluable help and cooperation on this project. We also want to thank Keith Pawlowski, Kurt Johnson, and Andreas Neunert for their contributions on this project. This project could not have happened without the help of the people mentioned above, and from all those who donated to our project

a jungle meeting just 400 meters from the Laos border. Several cameras were placed in strategic positions in this highly remote area.

a jungle meeting just 400 meters from the Laos border. Several cameras were placed in strategic positions in this highly remote area.

STAY TUNED FOR MORE CAMERA-TRAP PHOTOS!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One Response to First round of camera-trap results are in!

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